Accelerating scientific discovery through computation and visualization II
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Accelerating scientific discovery through computation and visualization II

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Published by U.S. Dept. of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Institute of Standards and Technology in Gaithersburg, MD .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • High performance computing,
  • Parallel processing (Electronic computers),
  • Visualization,
  • Discoveries in science

Book details:

Edition Notes

StatementJames S. Sims ... [et al.]
SeriesNISTIR -- 6877
ContributionsSims, James S, National Institute of Standards and Technology (U.S.)
The Physical Object
FormatMicroform
Pagination28 p.
Number of Pages28
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL14530599M
OCLC/WorldCa51616247

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Accelerating Scientific Discovery Through Computation and Visualization II Article (PDF Available) in Journal of research of the National Institute of Standards and Technology The rate of scientific discovery can be accelerated through computation and visualization. This acceleration results from the synergy of expertise, computing tools, and hardware for enabling high.   To accelerate scientific discovery, a parallelization of the program was done relatively quickly, in MPI (37, 38), using a simplified version of the replicated data approach (57). The advantage of the replicated data approach is, first and foremost, ease of programming. The rate of scientific discovery can be accelerated through computation and visualization. This acceleration results from the synergy of expertise, computing tools, and hardware for enabling high-performance computa-tion, information science, and visualization that is pro-vided by a team of computation and visualization sci-.

  The rate of scientific discovery can be accelerated through computation and visualization. This acceleration results from the synergy of expertise, computing tools, and hardware for enabling high performance computation, information science, and visualization that is provided by a team of computation and visualization scientists collaborating in a peer-to. peer effort with the research scientists. The rate of scientific discovery can be accelerated through computation and visualization. This acceleration results from the synergy of expertise, computing tools, and hardware for enabling high-performance computation, information science, and visualization that is provided by a team of computation and visualization scientists collaborating in a peer-to-peer effort with the research scientists. This is the third in a series of articles [1, 2] that describe, through examples, how the Scientific Applications and Visualization Group (SAVG) at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has utilized high performance parallel computing, visu- alization, and machine learning to accelerate scientific discovery. Get this from a library! Accelerating scientific discovery through computation and visualization II. [James S Sims; National Institute of Standards and Technology (U.S.);].

Scientific Discovery via Visualization Using Accelerated Computing. ParaView and VisIt offer VTK-m acceleration. difficult as it involves complex data structures with many data dependencies that must be coordinated across computing threads. Early work beginning around started independently in three projects, named EAVL. The chapter focuses on visualization. It is a method of computing that gives visual form to complex data. The growing importance of CS&E, especially with supercomputer capabilities, is creating a commensurate need for more sophisticated visual representations of natural phenomena across by: Ap Accelerating Particle Discoveries Through Computation 2 Measurements in HEP • Experimental High Energy Physics (HEP) studies particle reactions by creating well-defined initial states with particle accelerators and by measuring final states as well as possible with detectors. Scientific computing, including modeling and simulation, has become crucial for research problems that are insoluble by traditional theoretical and experimental approaches, hazardous to study in the laboratory, or time-consuming or expensive to solve by traditional means. DOE's Office of Science, Advanced Scientific Computing Research supports multidisciplinary projects aimed at accelerating.